Voices of Native Youth

Japanese Poetry Meets Navajo Writer

A Navajo writer tries her hand at a Japanese poetry form, proving that we can all learn from each other and embrace our differences. #poetry #haiku #nativeyouth #navajo #ownvoices

A Few Haiku for You

Last year as part of our English class we learned how to write different forms of poetry. Haiku, a traditional form of Japanese poetry, often talks about things found in nature. We went outside for inspiration in writing our haiku poems.

A haiku poem has five syllables in the first and third lines, and seven syllables in the second line. It doesn’t have to rhyme, which makes it easy to write.

A Perfect Day

Sun is shining bright 

Cold wind blowing on my face

A nice perfect day 

A Navajo writer tries her hand at a Japanese poetry form, proving that we can all learn from each other and embrace our differences. #poetry #haiku #nativeyouth #navajo #ownvoices

Tree in the Ground 

The tree is so green

With the bark brown as chocolate

Placed firm in the ground

A Navajo writer tries her hand at a Japanese poetry form, proving that we can all learn from each other and embrace our differences. #poetry #haiku #nativeyouth #navajo #ownvoices

The Best Place to Be

Very colorful 

A playground filled with children

The best place to be

A Navajo writer tries her hand at a Japanese poetry form, proving that we can all learn from each other and embrace our differences. #poetry #haiku #nativeyouth #navajo #ownvoices

Try it! Your (Japanese) Poetry Could be Featured Here!

If you’re a Native youth, we’d love to invite you to submit your poems to Voices of Native Youth for publication on our Creative Natives page. You don’t have to limit yourself to Japanese poetry, though.

Your pieces must be original. If we accept your poem for submission, we’ll need you to send us a short bio (tell us where you live, your tribe affiliation(s), your hobbies, and anything else you want the world to know). Just limit your bio to 100 words or less. Please also send us a clear photo of your face so we can feature you at the end of your post.

Send poetry submissions to: poetry@voicesofnativeyouth.com.

Adrienna is proud of her Navajo heritage. She’s in her last year of high school and has started taking classes at the local community college.

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